Identify the four metaparadigm concepts of nursing.

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Identify the four metaparadigm concepts of nursing.

Identify the four metaparadigm concepts of nursing.
Identify the four metaparadigm concepts of nursing.

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After completing this chapter, the student should be able to:

Learning Objectives

2Framework for Professional Nursing Practice Kathleen Masters

1. Identify the four metaparadigm concepts of nursing.

2. Identify and describe several theoretical works in nursing.

3. Begin the process of identifying theoretical frameworks of nursing that are consistent with a personal belief system.

Although the beginning of nursing theory development can be traced to Florence Nightingale, it was not until the second half of the 1900s that nurs- ing theory caught the attention of nursing as a discipline. During the decades of the 1960s and 1970s, theory development was a major topic of discussion and publication. During the 1970s, much of the discussion was related to the development of one global theory for nursing. However, in the 1980s, atten- tion turned from the development of a global theory for nursing as scholars began to recognize multiple approaches to theory development in nursing.

Because of the plurality in nursing theory, this information must be orga- nized to be meaningful for practice, research, and further knowledge devel- opment. The goal of this chapter is to present an organized and practical overview of the major concepts, models, philosophies, and theories that are essential in professional nursing practice.

It can be helpful to define some terms that might be unfamiliar. A concept is a term or label that describes a phenomenon (Meleis, 2004). The phenom- enon described by a concept can be either empirical or abstract. An empirical concept is one that can be either observed or experienced through the senses. An abstract concept is one that is not observable, such as hope or caring (Hickman, 2002).